​PowerSpeaking Blog: Tips and strategies for crafting presentations!

The Late Night Experience: Learning from a Master

They’d just done a tour of the NBC studios in New York City and were walking down to the merchandising area when someone from Seth Meyers’ Late Night show walked up and asked if they’d like to sit in on a rehearsal of that evening’s show. Mary McGlynn, owner of PowerSpeaking, Inc. and Melinda Henning, longtime Master Facilitator, looked at each other and said, “Absolutely!” We talked with them about what turned out to be an extraordinary experience...

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Helping Thought Leaders Communicate Big Ideas

People with big, bold, sometimes disruptive ideas are the ones who will help us meet the dramatic changes happening in the workplace now, and in the future (think, evolving global markets, warp-speed technology advances, and a new and very different generation of workers).  But people with trailblazing ideas need to be effective, persuasive communicators in order to convince people to follow their lead. That’s where PowerSpeaking and its new partnership with DisruptHR San Francisco come in.

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How to Run a Successful Virtual Meeting

If running effective, productive, in-person meetings wasn’t hard enough, nowadays video and teleconferencing add a whole new layer of complication. “There’s no doubt that virtual meetings give us flexibility and global reach that creates all kinds of possibilities for collaboration,” says PowerSpeaking’s Chief Learning Officer, Carrie Beckstrom. “But like any technology, we have to learn to use it well. And when it comes to virtual meetings, that technical know-how must be in addition to the application of best practices that make any kind of meeting, in any setting, successful.”

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Who Gets Heard—And Why

Immediately after the recent U.S. Democratic debates, newspapers and social media ran commentaries observing how much more often the male candidates, vs. the female, interrupted other panelists and the moderators (especially on the first night). Because of those interruptions, the men commanded much more airtime over the course of the debates. The New York Times, The Atlantic, and Inc. Magazine were just a few media we read that took a closer look at that gender phenomenon. Then there was the Los Angeles Times, which didn’t mince words with this headline: “Democratic debates mirror life: Men yell and interrupt. Women (mostly) wait their turn.”

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