​PowerSpeaking Blog: Tips and strategies for crafting presentations

Breaking Through 'The Real Glass Ceiling': Executive Power Culture

 

For decades, people of all backgrounds have sought to break through what they consider a "glass ceiling" to live up to their full potential at work. Often referring to the struggle for highly qualified women to break through an invisible, unspoken barrier and achieve the highest echelon of executive leadership, the question is what gets in the way. 

There are multiple reasons that quality candidates aren't promoted when they should be. While this glass ceiling may be in response to socially held prejudices and misconceptions (relating to gender, race, sexuality, and background), the basic obstacle that stands in the way of the promotion of many to senior and executive positions is simply the culture of power that permeates the highest levels of business leadership.

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Lean On Me: The Importance of Having a Sponsor When Presenting

You’ve been asked to present to upper management. You’ve done the research. You’ve worked hours to get everything to logically flow and the numbers to tie. When a subject matter expert is asked to present to decision makers, the hurdles can be a challenge. These spaces are typically "by invitation only," meaning that — regardless of how innovative your idea may be — you need someone on the inside to help steer the way. 

This is where a sponsor — another high-level decision maker who acts as your guide within these rooms — can be an invaluable asset. When making steps to put yourself in front of executives, business leaders, or other managers, a sponsor can be the difference between a cold, indifferent presentation environment and a warm room full of decision makers who are open to your ideas.

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Behind the Scenes of TED Presenters

 

TED Talks — an acronym for Technology, Entertainment, and Design — are almost universally considered the gold standard for successful public speaking. Curated by author and entrepreneur Chris Anderson and the TED leadership team, videos of TED speakers at conferences routinely go viral, racking up millions of views from all over the world.

The short, compelling presentations are delivered by thought leaders, craftsmen, artists, scientists, executives and innovators in a variety of fields. Filmed at TED conferences nationwide, speakers vary greatly and have included countless luminaries, including Sarah Silverman, Tony Robbins, Elizabeth Gilbert, Steve Jobs, Bill Gates, Al Gore, J.K. Rowling and many, many more.

What unites all these different figures? They have all harnessed the most effective presentation skills to deliver persuasive, insightful, funny, emotional and — most importantly — compelling speeches to rapt audiences on the TED stage. Here is a guide to what makes a TED talk so engaging and what tools subject matter and technical experts can use to make their own presentations as compelling — straight from the experts themselves.

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Introductions: A Winning Game Plan for Any Conference

We've all seen it the clumsy handoff at a conference or even with a special guest to a staff meeting. That handoff (the introduction) is part of the winning game plan.

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6 Strategies for Surviving Executive Presentations

In Fortune 500 conference rooms around the world, management careers are careening off the tracks. Why? Poor delivery? No. Bad content?

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Warm Up Your Voice for Credibility, Connection and Influence

You may have been told to “speak up” to project your voice across a room. But that’s not so easy.

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"A Shining City on the Hill" How A Metaphor Can Touch your Audience

FAMOUS METAPHORS:

"All the world's a stage." (Shakespeare)

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Speech Clarity Opens Career Doors

Speech Clarity Opens Career Doors

If English is your second (or third or fourth)  language and you want to know if your speech clarity is a problem for you at work, consider the following questions:

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